Tuesday, November 14, 2017

Kittens-Wean Naturally By Mom and Continue Feeding Past Six Weeks

This is why we didn't let our kittens be adopted until they were 12 weeks old and argued AGAINST them being removed from their mother at 8 wks. (Of course, only two eventually left the house at 12 wks.) I had read many articles about kitten growth and read that 12 weeks should be more standard and that 6 weeks is only based on when kittens begin to start eating and that kittens are not done growing and learning from mom at 6 weeks.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/09/170915165217.htm

"Early weaning increases aggression and stereotypic behavior in cats. Based on the study, the recommended weaning age of 12 weeks should be raised by at least two weeks. Delaying weaning is an easy and cost-efficient way of improving the quality of life of cats."

Taking Care of Senior-Elderly-Cats

One day you have a kitten; six years later and it's now a "Senior"; ten years later and it's considered "OLD"!  Meanwhile, the cat may be running around acting still very much like a kitten. There is a lot to be aware of as a cat ages; and a lot more to prevent.

Here's an article about taking care of a senior pet. It suggests monitoring weight and getting the cat to lose weight; monitoring activity levels; and watching for signs of physical changes. 


https://catfriendly.com/cat-care-at-home/senior-care/10-tips/#.WdvSSgkrIAA.facebook

It's Getting Cold Outside-Keep HCM Cats Warm and Indoors

As a reminder: it's getting cold in the world, in general, at this time of year. Keep your HCM cats indoors, keep them out of cold windows and drafts, keep their rooms well heated. Stress causes congestion, and fighting to stay warm causes stress on the body. 

Cataracts in Cats

Cataracts are not life threatening but can be the result of an injury to the cat's eye which may be life or vision threatening. Cataracts themselves cause a loss of vision. Cataracts-as in humans-will appear as a white or milky white spot that grows over the eye. Healthy cats may have surgery to remove the lens and have a fake one replaced. There may be drops that will be used. If you see a white glaze forming over the cat's eye, or if the cat seems to be pawing at the eye, or if you see goop running off, or any other changes to the appearance of the eye, the cat should see the vet as soon as possible to address the issue.

None of our cats have cataracts so far. 

Glaucoma in Cats-How to Tell If Your Cat's Eye Pressure is Increasing

There are many illnesses that are difficult for pet owners to assess in cats because our cats can't tell us how they are feeling. We can only watch and observe for changes in behavior and those looks on their faces or in their actions that say "I'm not doing well." One disease is glaucoma. Unlike other diseases that cause the eye to produce goop (herpes), or appear to be red and bloody (uveitis), or make the second lid appear (injury, other diseases), glaucoma may be impossible to detect at home. Your cat may paw extensively at the eye; may shake its head. Blood veins may appear pronounced as the disease in the eye is at its worst. The pupil may become dilated or fixed, not contracting as much as the other eye. But really-that could be anything. If you find your cat pawing at the eye, shaking its head, and especially if you do find goop running out, bloody eye, second lid coming down, take your cat to the vet. Your vet can check pressures, and put in drops to lower pressure. The cat would need drugs for the rest of its life to keep pressures low. Your cat doesn't have all of the same options humans have of various surgical techniques to lower pressure but some techniques can be deployed (including lens replacement which is what is done for cataract surgery.) Many cats face having eyes removed. Untreated glaucoma-for pets and humans-can lead to optic nerve damage and loss of vision. The increase in pressure will also make the cat sick-just as with humans-vomiting, dizziness, lack of eating, etc.
It may not be a bad idea to have pressures tested in your cat once a year or anytime you feel the cat is troubled by an eye. 
None of our cats have glaucoma but we know humans who do and it can be difficult for humans to detect it in themselves-even if they have annual eye exams-as the symptoms for them appeared as headaches, spotty vision when they bent over and came up again, etc.-signs they and their doctor thought were simply related to sinus trouble. Until it wasn't. 

This is separate from cataracts which will appear as a white or milky cover over the cat's eye as it grows.

Thursday, September 14, 2017

Atenolol Drug Shortage-You May Need a Compounding Pharmacy

There is a drug shortage for Atenolol, a very important medication. Atenolol is often prescribed for HCM cats. It works to lower the heart rate and blood pressure by working on the heart muscle. It is vitally important that the heart rate and blood pressure come under control for an HCM cat. Most cats with HCM have a high heart rate. A damaged heart should not be overworked and stressed. Lowering the heart rate also helps to lower blood pressure, although Atenolol is only one drug that the cat might need to lower blood pressure. 
Our vet cardio released this statement:
"Some of you may already be aware that there is a nationwide shortage of this medication due to a production issue. Many pharmacies are running low, which is becoming an issue for our cardiac patients who are receiving it.

There are a couple of options:
1) Continue calling around to pharmacies in your area since some pharmacies still have it in stock.
2) Get it compounded at a specialty compounding pharmacy. We prefer to use Wedgewood for our compounding needs. Atenolol can be made into tablets, capsules or liquid suspension. See the link below for more info..."
If you or your vet are unable to find Atenolol locally, here are two reputable pharmacies you can try:
https://www.roadrunnerpharmacy.com/

Also, Google "compounding pharmacy" for your area. You may find one locally. Your vet would call in a script for them to fill. 

Protect Cords and Stop Cats From Chewing on Electrical Wires

I'm using various items to protect wires and cords throughout the house from the one cat in the house-Roxanne-that likes to chew on them when she's anxious. I ordered the black coiled wire covers from Amazon to cover all cords and wires. It comes in different width sizes. My husband ordered the Power ADD metal phone cord from Amazon. They also sell laptop cords. It's supposed to be chew proof. Let's hope.

There are various types of materials one can find at Amazon (and other online sites) to protect pets from chewing. Simply do a word search at Amazon or Google for cord protectors or chew proof cords.